Tips To Thrive

5 Steps to Preventing Resistance

Using glyphosate as the primary, or only herbicide mode of action has resulted in an increase in herbicide-resistant and hard-to-control weeds like waterhemp, marestail, pigweed and giant ragwweed.


The Enlist™ weed control system provides an effective tool to use against glyphosate and hard-to-control weeds. Here are five steps for using the Enlist system as part of an integrated weed management program.


1. USE A HERBICIDE PROGRAM APPROACH — WITH MULTIPLE MODES OF ACTION

  • Use a broad-spectrum soil residual herbicide with different modes of action in a weed control program, followed by a timely postemergence application of Enlist Duo® herbicide or Enlist One™.
  • If resistance is suspected, treat weed escapes with a herbicide that has a mode of action other than Group 4 or Group 9 and/or use nonchemical methods to remove escapes, as practical, with the goal of preventing seed, root or tuber production.
  • Utilize sequential applications of herbicides with alternative modes of action.
  • Rotate the use of Enlist Duo herbicide or Enlist One herbicide with non-Group 4 and non-Group 9 herbicides.
  • Avoid using more than two applications of Enlist Duo herbicide or Enlist One herbicide and any other Group 4 or Group 9 herbicide within a single growing season unless used in conjunction with another mode of action herbicide with an overlapping spectrum.

2. MAKE TIMELY APPLICATIONS OF HERBICIDES

  • Apply full labeled rates of Enlist Duo herbicide for the most difficult-to-control weed in the field at the specified time (correct weed size) to minimize weed escapes.

3. SCOUT WEEDS BEFORE AND AFTER APPLICATION

  • Scout fields before application to ensure herbicides and use rates will be appropriate for the weed spectrum and weed size present.
  • Scout fields after application to detect weed escapes or shifts in the weed spectrum.
  • Early detection of possible resistant species can limit the spread of these weed populations and allow for the implementation of alternate weed management practices.

4. SEE THE BIG PICTURE, BEYOND THE FIELD AND THE HERBICIDE

  • Incorporate nonchemical weed control practices, such as mechanical cultivation, crop rotation, cover crops and weed-free crop seeds, as part of an integrated weed control program.
  • Manage weeds in and around fields, during and after harvest, to reduce weed seed production.
  • Thoroughly clean plant residues from equipment before leaving fields suspected to contain resistant weeds.

5. AGRONOMIC AND CULTURAL PRACTICES

  • Rotate crops and cultural practices to allow for a wider range of weed control practices.
  • Start with a clean field, using either a burndown herbicide application or tillage.
  • Use only commercial, weed-free crop seed.
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